Normal Public Library Teens

Crafts and How-To

Subversive Seamster by Melissa Alvarado, Hope Meng, and Melissa Rannels

Your secret roadmap to the jewels of thrifting and the ins and outs of refashioning. This book has shortcuts, tips, and secrets to the wide world of inexpensive, individualized fashion. Our clothes make a statement about who we are. What better way to say, “I am an individual!” than to wear one-of-a-kind items made out of other one-of-a-kind items? (A/YA)

Mythbusters: Don’t Try This At Home by The Discovery Channel

It’s a tough job separating truth from urban legend, but the MythBusters are here to serve. In this book, you’ll learn how they either “busted” or confirmed fifteen myths on their show, often with spectacular results. Plus, do your own mythbusting with fun experiments you can do safely at home. (M, S)

Amigurumi! Super Happy Crochet Cute by Elisabeth Doherty

Crochet is not just about ponchos and scarves anymore: it’s about amigurumi, a hip new craft trend! These Japanese-inspired dolls have motivated crocheters everywhere to grab their hooks and create collections of irresistibly funky-cute creatures. Start with an easy cupcake, move on to a palm-sized mouse, and work up to the more challenging and spectacular projects, like a punk rock bunny or a beatnik kitty—complete with black turtleneck, beret, and goatee. (M, S)

Creepy Cute Crochet by Christen Haden

This unique craft book contains more than 25 patterns for zombies, ninjas, Vikings, vampires, aliens, robots, and even Death himself. Each easy-to-follow pattern is presented with step-by-step diagrams, hilarious commentary, and full-color photographs of the creatures in their natural environments. Plus each pattern is ranked according to difficulty so that even beginners can share in the fun. (M, S)

Not Another Teen Knitting Book by Vickie Howell

Whether you’re in the drama club (theater mask hats), celebrating your first car (steering wheel, headrest, and seatbelt cozies), or heading for the track meet (athletic socks), there’s something for everyone in this book full of hip, urban-styled project ideas. Plus, Howell offers “Knitting 101” for beginners, and ranks the projects by difficulty, from “Freshman” for the simplest to “Varsity” for those who enjoy a challenge. (M, S)

Indie Girl by Arne Johnson and Karen Macklin

A fun and comprehensive guide for young women that contains all the information you’ll need to start independent creative ventures, like dance companies, rock bands, art galleries, fashion companies, and more. You’ll also read quotes from teen and professional artists, receive technical and creative advice from pros, and get a better understanding of why and how women should be working together in the arts. (M, S)

Sticky Note Origami: 25 Designs to Make at Your Desk by David Mitchell

Everyone has them: ordinary pads of sticky notes in a range of colors and sizes that can quickly become attractive paper sculptures. All it takes is a few minutes to finish off something beautiful. Each of the 20 projects-including 3-D animals, posies to put on a message, and geometric designs-feature detailed diagrams and a color photo of the completed piece. (A/YA)

Generation T by Megan Nicolay

This inspirational guide with DIY attitude has everything you need to know about the world’s great T-shirt: how to cut it, sew it, deconstruct it, reconstruct it, and best of all, transform it. Features more than 100 projects (plus 200 variations) for customized tees, tank tops, tube tops, T-skirts—even handbags, a patchwork blanket, iPod cozies, leg warmers, and more. (A/YA)

Anticraft: Knitting, Beading and Stitching for the Slightly Sinister by Renee Rigdon

Filled with projects such as the Tough Baby Sweater, the I [Skull] Trouble Tote and a sleek, black duct-tape corset, Anticraft transforms traditional crafts into quirky wearable fashion. Featuring a variety of knitting, crochet, stitching and beading projects the book instructs, inspires and entertains. (A/YA)

Sneakier Uses for Everyday Things by Cy Tymony

Covers 40 new educational and unique projects that anybody can successfully complete with simple household items. The book includes a list of necessary materials, detailed sketches, and step-by-step instructions for each gadget and gizmo. (M, S)

 
 

Grade Level Interest
M Middle School (defined as grades 6-8).
S Senior High (defined as grades 9-12).
A/YA Adult-marketed book recommended for teens.

 
 
Back to Truth to Tell (nonfiction)
 

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