Normal Public Library Teens

Advice and Self-Help

The Six Most Important Decisions You’ll Ever Make by Sean Covey 

Sean Covey gives teens the strong advice they need to make informed and wise decisions.Using real stories from teens around the world, Sean shows teens how to succeed in school, make good friends, get along with parents, wisely handle dating and sex issues, avoid or overcome addictions, build self-esteem, and much more. (M, S)

Declare Yourself: Speak, Connect, Act, Vote 

Celebrated Americans—from Adrian Grenier to Amber Tamblyn to Hayden Panettiere to Alice Walker— share their compelling perspectives on voting and civic involvement in this one-of-a-kind book. Guest edited by actress America Ferrera, this collection of more than fifty essays and unique pieces explores topics ranging from “The First Time I Voted” to “Why the Personal is Political,” all straight from the pens of public figures you know and admire. Read it—and then join them! Declare yourself. (S)

Girlwise: How to Be Confident, Capable, Cool and In Control by Julia DeVillers 

What do you do when…you’re at the lunch table and you knock your soda over into someone’s lap? Or, you need a job? You hate your clothes? You’re broke? Inside, more than 100 experts tell you how to deal with these problems and so much more. GirlWise is one-stop shopping for all the stuff you want to, you need to, you MUST know! (M, S)

The Motley Fool Investment Guide for Teens: 8 Steps to Having More Money Than Your Parents Ever Dreamed Of by David and Tom Gardner 

The Motley Fool Investment Guide for Teens helps teens stand out from the ho-hum mutual-fund crowd, build a portfolio of stocks they can actually care about, and take advantage of the investor’s best friend – time – to watch their profits multiply. Warning: this is not your parents’ money guide! From identifying companies that are both cool and profitable to building a portfolio that makes tracking investments exciting, The Motley Fool Investment Guide for Teens shows young investors the way to financial freedom. (S)

The Career Chronicles: An Insider’s Guide to What Jobs Are Really Like by Michael Gregory 

In this nuts-and-bolts guide, over 750 professionals speak candidly about “the good, the bad, and the ugly” of two dozen popular professions. Dispensing with romantic fantasies, real-world professionals — from nurses and pharmacists to architects and attorneys — speak about the day-to-day realities of their careers. Chapters include overviews of each profession, followed by helpful information about education, testing, and registration and licensing requirements; the number of positions across the country; and the average starting or median annual salaries. (S)

It’s Your World: If You Don’t Like It, Change It by Mikki Halpin 

There are lots of issues you care about – and now you can do something about them. It’s Your World will show you how to act on your beliefs, no matter what they are, and make a difference. Whether at home, in school, or in your community, you have the power and the ability to create change, even if you aren’t old enough to vote. Don’t wait until you’re eighteen to flex your political muscles – start right now! (M, S)

Acing the College Application by Michele A. Hernandez 

When applying for college, good grades and high standardized test scores are not always enough to guarantee admission. What sets you apart is the way you describe yourself in your application. But how do you present yourself with flair, and highlight all your talents, skills, and passions, in just a few pages? A former assistant director of admissions at Dartmouth College, Dr. Hernández takes you step-by-step through the entire application process, revealing the details that make or break an applicant. From the multitude of short and longer essays to the myriad of charts, lists, and personal data sections, she offers essential advice, useful anecdotes, and vivid examples. (S)

Life Freaks Me Out – And Then I Deal With It by K.L. Hong 

Inspired by the concerns of real teenagers, this thoughtful memoir addresses the many turbulent, confusing, and exhilarating situations teens face. Big questions such as Who am I?, What’s important to me?, and What am I called to do on this planet? are explored in candid autobiographical essays as well as bits of wisdom garnered from relatives, ancient poets, popular movies, coworkers, and a host of other sources. Sexuality, drug use, friendships, stress management, and self-esteem are among the important adolescent topics that this personal memoir addresses with warmth, compassion, and wit. (S)

97 Things to Do Before You Finish High School by Steven Jenkins and Erika Stalder 

Suggesting that there is more to a teenager’s life than just homework and classes, this fun and helpful guide outlines the must-do items for every teenager—from going on a road trip to learning one’s blood type—and offers advice on such topics as friendship, dating, and independence. Motivational, funny, sincere, and packed with information, this is an ideal resource for the adventure-seeking high schooler. (S)

The Guy Book: An Owner’s Manual by Mavis Jukes 

The Guy Book delivers sound information and useful advice for boys preparing to go through, or in the midst of, puberty. Boys will find specific information on a variety of subjects, from getting rid of acne to finding help for depression. Answering questions that are too embarrassing to ask, dealing with guy-basics like tying a tie, being a good friend, and essential dating dos and don’ts, this is a must-have for boys who want to get the facts, be in control, and learn how to make informed choices. (M, S)

The Teen Guide to Global Action by Barbara A. Lewis 

Teens everywhere are deciding they can’t wait to become adults to change the world. They’re acting right now to fight hunger and poverty, promote health and human rights, save the environment, and work for peace. Their stories prove that young people can make a difference on a global scale. This book includes real-life stories to inspire readers, plus a rich menu of opportunities for service, fast facts, hands-on activities, user-friendly tools, and up-to-date resources teens can use to put their own volunteer spirit into practice. (M, S)

In Their Shoes: Extraordinary Women Describe Their Amazing Careers by Deborah Reber 

Follow in the footsteps of amazing women who have the job of your dreams. Find out what you really want to know about your career choices in a book packed full of answers. “Day in the Life” profiles will inspire you, while a ton of sidebars, lists, and helpful tips will get you started right away on finding the career that’s right for you. Discover words of wisdom from women in the workforce. Browse through the profiles to find the job that’s right for you, or use the career chooser to narrow your search. (S)

Generation Green: The Ultimate Teen Guide to Living an Eco-Friendly Life by Linda and Tosh Sivertsen 

We all know about the Earth’s environmental crisis, but there is someone who can truly make a difference: you. If you text your friends or chat with them online, download music to your iPod, or toss bottles and papers into recycling bins, you’re already more eco-savvy than you think. It’s just as easy to do even more to help save the earth, and Generation Green shows you how. This book lays out the inside scoop on the biggest issues affecting our planet, offers tips on how to shop, dress, eat, and travel the green way, and includes interviews with teens like you who are involved with fun, innovative green causes.  (M, S)

The Gatekeepers: Inside the Admissions Process of a Premier College by Jacques Steinberg 

Over the course of nearly a year, New York Times education reporter Jacques Steinberg accompanied admissions officer Ralph Figueroa on a tour to assess and recruit the most promising students in the country. The Gatekeepers follows a diverse group of prospective students as they compete for places in the nation’s most elite colleges. (A/YA)

 
 

Grade Level Interest
M Middle School (defined as grades 6-8).
S Senior High (defined as grades 9-12).
A/YA Adult-marketed book recommended for teens.

 
 
Back to Truth to Tell (nonfiction)
 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

 
%d bloggers like this: