Normal Public Library Teens

Printz Award

The Michael L. Printz Award is an award for a book that exemplifies literary excellence in young adult literature. It is named for a Topeka, Kansas school librarian who was a long-time active member of the Young Adult Library Services Association. The award is sponsored by Booklist, a publication of the American Library Association.

2011 Printz Award Winner

Ship Breaker by Paolo Bacigalupi

In America’s Gulf Coast region, where grounded oil tankers are being broken down for parts, Nailer, a teenage boy, works the light crew, scavenging for copper wiring just to make quota – and hopefully live to see another day. But when, by luck or chance, he discovers an exquisite clipper ship beached during a recent hurricane, Nailer faces the most important decision of his life: Strip the ship for all it’s worth or rescue its lone survivor, a beautiful and wealthy girl who could lead him to a better life… (S)

2011 Printz Honor Books

Stolen by Lucy Christopher

Gemma is on layover at Bangkok Airport, en route with her parents to a vacation in Vietnam. She steps away for just a second, to get a cup of coffee. Ty – rugged, tan, oddly familiar – pays for Gemma’s drink. And drugs it. And before Gemma knows what’s happening, Ty takes her.  The unknowing object of a long obsession, Gemma has been kidnapped by her stalker and brought to the desolate Australian Outback. This is her gripping story of survival, of how she has to come to terms with her living nightmare – or die trying to fight it. (S)

Please Ignore Vera Dietz by A.S. King

Vera’s spent her whole life secretly in love with her best friend, Charlie Kahn. And over the years she’s kept a lot of his secrets. Even after he betrayed her. Even after he ruined everything. So when Charlie dies in dark circumstances, Vera knows a lot more than anyone—the kids at school, his family, even the police. But will she emerge to clear his name? Does she even want to? (S)

Revolver by Marcus Sedgwick

In an isolated cabin, fourteen-year-old Sig is alone with a corpse: his father, who has fallen through the ice and frozen to death only hours earlier. Then comes a stranger claiming that Sig’s father owes him a share of a horde of stolen gold. Sig’s only protection is a loaded Colt revolver hidden in the cabin’s storeroom. The question is, will Sig use the gun, and why? (S)

Nothing by Janne Teller

On the first day of seventh grade, Pierre Anthon announces that life has no meaning and walks out of school. Pierre’s shaken classmates scramble to prove him wrong. They begin to assemble a “heap of meaning” in an abandoned sawmill. Each child must add a possession of the others’ choosing. The pile is started with a lifetime’s collection of Dungeons & Dragons books, a fishing rod, a pair of green sandals, a pet hamster – but then, as each demand becomes more extreme, things start taking a very morbid twist, and the kids become ever more desperate to get Pierre Anthon down. And what if, after all these sacrifices, the pile is not meaningful enough? (S)

2010 Printz Award Winner

Going Bovine by Libba Bray

All 16-year-old Cameron wants is to get through high school with a minimum of effort. It’s not a lot to ask. But that’s before he’s given some bad news: he’s sick and he’s going to die. Which totally sucks. Hope arrives in the winged form of Dulcie, a loopy punk angel/possible hallucination with a bad sugar habit. She tells Cam there is a cure—if he’s willing to go in search of it. With the help of a death-obsessed, video-gaming dwarf and a yard gnome, Cam sets off on the mother of all road trips through a twisted America into the heart of what matters most. (S)

2010 Printz Honor Books

Charles and Emma by Deborah Heiligman

Charles Darwin published The Origin of Species, his revolutionary tract on evolution and the fundamental ideas involved, in 1859. Nearly 150 years later, the theory of evolution continues to create tension between the scientific and religious communities. This same debate raged within Darwin himself, and played an important part in his marriage with his wife, Emma.  Deborah Heiligman’s new biography of Charles Darwin is a thought-provoking account of the man behind evolutionary theory: how his personal life affected his work and vice versa. (M, S)

The Monstrumologist by Rick Yancey

These are the secrets I have kept.  This is the trust I never betrayed.  But he is dead now and has been for more than forty years, the one who gave me his trust, the one for whom I kept these secrets.  The one who saved me…and the one who cursed me. So begins the journal of Will Henry, orphaned assistant to Dr. Pellinore Warthrop, a man with an unusual specialty: monstrumology, the study of monsters. In his time with the doctor, Will has met many a mysterious late-night visitor, and seen things he never imagined were real. But when a grave robber comes calling in the middle of the night with a gruesome find, he brings with him their most deadly case yet. (M, S)

Punkzilla by Adam Rapp

For a runaway boy who goes by the name “Punkzilla,” kicking a meth habit and a life of petty crime in Portland, Oregon, is a prelude to a mission: reconnecting with his older brother, a gay man dying of cancer in Memphis. On his way, he meets a colorful, sometimes dangerous cast of characters. And in letters to his sibling, he catalogs them all — from an abusive stranger and a ghostly girl to a kind transsexual and an old woman with an oozing eye. The language is raw and revealing, crackling with visceral details and dark humor, yet with each interstate exit Punkzilla’s journey grows more urgent: will he make it to Tennessee in time? (S)

Tales of the Madman Underground by John Barnes

Wednesday, September 5, 1973: The first day of Karl Shoemaker’s senior year in stifling Lightsburg, Ohio. For years, Karl’s been part of what he calls “the Madman Underground”—a group of kids forced to attend group therapy during school hours. Karl has decided that senior year is going to be different.  He’s going to act – and be – normal. But normal, of course, is relative. Karl has five after-school jobs, one dead father, one seriously unhinged drunk mother…and a huge attitude. . (S)

2009 Printz Award Winner

Jellicoe Road by Melina Marchetta

Abandoned by her mother on Jellicoe Road when she was eleven, Taylor Markham, now seventeen, is finally being confronted with her past. But as the reluctant leader of her boarding school dorm, there isn’t a lot of time for introspection. And while Hannah, the closest adult Taylor has to family, has disappeared, Jonah Griggs is back in town, moody stares and all. (S)

2009 Printz Honor Books

The Astonishing Life of Octavian Nothing, Traitor to the Nation, Volume II, The Kingdom on the Waves by M.T. Anderson

In Volume II of Octavian’s story, he recounts his experiences as the Revolutionary War explodes around him, thrusting him into intense battles and tantalizing him with elusive visions of liberty.  Sundered from all he knows — the College of Lucidity, the rebel cause — Octavian hopes to find safe harbor. Instead, he is soon to learn of Lord Dunmore’s proclamation offering freedom to slaves who join the counterrevolutionary forces. (S)

The Disreputable History of Frankie Landau-Banks by E. Lockhart

Frankie Landau-Banks at age 14 is a mildly geeky girl attending a highly competitive boarding school. At 15, she’s got a knockout figure, a chip on her shoulder, and a gorgeous new senior boyfriend. And she’s no longer the kind of girl to take no for an answer. Especially when no means she’s excluded from her boyfriend’s all-male secret society. Especially when she knows she’s smarter than any of them. And especially when there are so many, many pranks to be done. (M, S)

Nation by Terry Pratchett

Alone on a desert island after a tidal wave, Mau is the last surviving member of his nation. He’s completely alone – or so he thinks until he finds Daphne, the  sole survivor of a shipwreck on the island. Together, Mau and Daphne discover some remarkable things, and start to forge a new nation. (M, S)

Tender Morsels by Margo Lanagan

Liga lives modestly in her own personal heaven, a world given to her in exchange for her earthly life. Her two daughters grow up in this soft place, protected from the violence that once harmed their mother. But the real world cannot be denied forever—magicked men and wild bears break down the borders of Liga’s refuge. Now, having known Heaven, how will these three women survive in a world where beauty and brutality lie side by side? (S)

2008 Printz Award Winner

The White Darkness by Geraldine McCaughrean

Sym is not your average teenage girl. She is obsessed with the Antarctic and the brave, romantic—and long dead—figure of Captain Oates from Scott’s doomed expedition to the South Pole. But Sym’s uncle Victor is even more obsessed—and when he takes her on a dream trip into the bleak Antarctic wilderness, it turns into a nightmarish struggle for survival that will challenge everything she knows and loves. (M, S)

2008 Printz Honor Books

Dreamquake by Elizabeth Knox

Aided by her family and her creation, Nown, Laura investigates the powerful Regulatory Body’s involvement in mysterious disappearances and activities and learns, in the process, the true nature of the Place in which dreams are found. Sequel to Dreamhunter. (M, S)

One Whole and Perfect Dayby Judith Clarke

As her irritating family prepares to celebrate her grandfather’s eightieth birthday, sixteen-year-old Lily yearns for just one whole perfect day together. (M, S)

Repossessed by A.M. Jenkins

A fallen angel, tired of being unappreciated while doing his pointless, demeaning job, leaves Hell, enters the body of a seventeen-year-old boy, and tries to experience the full range of human feelings before being caught and punished, while the boy’s family and friends puzzle over his changed behavior. (S)

Your Own, Sylvia by Stephanie Hemphill

On a bleak February day in 1963 a young American poet died by her own hand, and passed into a myth that has since imprinted itself on the hearts and minds of millions. She was and is Sylvia Plath and Your Own, Sylvia is a portrait of her life, told in poems. (M, S)

2007 Printz Award Winner

American Born Chinese by Gene Luen Yang

Through three separate, seemingly unconnected stories, this graphic novel tells the story of a Chinese American teenager as he faces racial stereotypes. (M, S)

2007 Printz Honor Books

The Astonishing Life of Octavian Nothing, Traitor to the Nation; v. 1: The Pox Party by M.T. Anderson

This historical novel is set during the Revolutionary era in America. Young Octavian, son of an African princess, is raised and given a classical education by a group of gentlemen on a Boston estate, until he discovers the horrifying secret behind his life and education. (S)

An Abundance of Katherines by John Green

Colin Singleton, self-proclaimed washed-up child prodigy, has only ever dated girls named Katherine. Upon being dumped by Katherine the 19th, he falls into a depression that his best friend Hassan tries to cure by taking him on a road trip to Tennessee, where the two find a job, meet a girl named Lindsey, and Colin struggles to formulate a mathematical theorem of love. (S)

Surrender by Sonya Hartnett

In this psychological thriller, 20-year-old Gabriel, on his deathbed, looks back on his life, remembering a horrific mistake he made as a child, and his friendship with the dangerous and unstable Finnegan. (S)

The Book Thief by Markus Zusak

Narrated by Death, this is the story of the Book Thief: Liesel Meminger, growing up in World War II-era Germany. Adopted by foster parents living in a tough, working-class neighborhood, Leisel learns to read and faces the devastation of war. (S)

2006 Printz Award Winner

Looking for Alaska by John Green

Miles “Pudge” Halter is done with his safe life at home. He heads off to the sometimes crazy and anything-but-boring world of Culver Creek Boarding School, and his life becomes the opposite of safe. Because down the hall is Alaska Young. The gorgeous, clever, funny, sexy, self-destructive, screwed up, and utterly fascinating Alaska Young. She pulls Pudge into her world and steals his heart. Then… (S)

2006 Printz Honor Books

Black Juice by Margo Lanagan

Provides glimpses of the dark side of civilization and the beauty of the human spirit through ten short stories that explore significant moments in people’s lives, events leading to them, and their consequences. (S)

A Wreath for Emmett Till by Marilyn Nelson

Award-winning poet Marilyn Nelson reminds us of Emmett Till, the boy whose lynching helped spark the civil rights movement. This martyr’s wreath, woven from a little-known but sophisticated form of poetry, challenges us to speak out against modern-day injustices, to “speak what we see.” (M, S)

John Lennon: All I Want is the Truth by Elizabeth Partridge

The story of one of rock’s biggest legends, from his birth during a 1940 World War II air raid on Liverpool, through his turbulent childhood and teen years, to his celebrated life writing, recording, and performing with the Beatles and beyond. (M, S)

I Am the Messenger by Markus Zusak

After capturing a bank robber, nineteen-year-old cab driver Ed Kennedy begins receiving mysterious messages that direct him to addresses where people need help, and he begins getting over his lifelong feeling of worthlessness. (S)

2005 Printz Award Winner

How I Live Now by Meg Rosoff

Daisy is sent to England to visit her aunt and cousins she’s never met, but her aunt goes away on business soon after Daisy arrives. The next day London is attacked and occupied by an unnamed enemy. As power and the system fails, the farm becomes more isolated. Despite the war, it’s a kind of Eden, with no adults in charge and no rules, a place where Daisy’s bond with her cousins grows into something rare and extraordinary. But the war is everywhere, and Daisy and her cousins must lead each other into a world that is unknown in the scariest, most elemental way. (M, S)

2005 Printz Honor Books

Airborn by Kenneth Oppel

Matt, a young cabin boy aboard an airship, and Kate, a wealthy young girl traveling with her chaperone, team up to search for the existence of mysterious winged creatures reportedly living hundreds of feet above the Earth’s surface. (M, S)

Lizzie Bright and the Buckminster Boy by Gary Schmidt

In 1911, Turner Buckminster hates his new home of Phippsburg, Maine, but things improve when he meets Lizzie Bright Griffin, a girl from a poor, nearby island community founded by former slaves that the town fathers–and Turner’s–want to change into a tourist spot. (M, S)

Chanda’s Secrets by Allan Stratton

The statistics of the millions infected with HIV/AIDS in southern Africa find a human face in this gripping story of one teenager, Chanda Kabele, who sees the disease threaten her family and community. (S)

2004 Printz Award Winner

The First Part Last by Angela Johnson

Bobby’s carefree teenage life changes forever when he becomes a father and must care for his adored baby daughter. (S)

2004 Printz Honor Books

A Northern Light by Jennifer Donnelly

Desperate for money, Mattie Gokey takes a job at the Glenmore, where hotel guest Grace Brown entrusts her with the task of burning a secret bundle of letters. But when Grace’s drowned body is fished from the lake, Mattie discovers that the letters could reveal the grim truth behind a murder. Set in 1906 against the backdrop of the real-life murder that inspired Theodore Dreiser’s “An American Tragedy”. (S)

Keesha’s House by Helen Frost

Seven teens facing such problems as pregnancy, closeted homosexuality, and abuse each describe in poetic forms what caused them to leave home and where they found home again. (S)

Fat Kid Rules the World by K.L. Going

Seventeen-year-old Troy, depressed, suicidal, and weighing nearly 300 pounds, gets a new perspective on life when a homeless teenager who is a genius on guitar wants Troy to be the drummer in his rock band. (S)

The Earth, My Butt, and Other Big Round Things by Carolyn Mackler

Feeling like she does not fit in with the other members of her family, who are all thin, brilliant, and good-looking, fifteen-year-old Virginia tries to deal with her self-image, her first physical relationship, and her disillusionment with some of the people closest to her. (M, S)

2003 Printz Award Winner

Postcards From No Man’s Land by Aidan Chambers

Alternates between two stories—contemporarily, seventeen-year-old Jacob visits a daunting Amsterdam at the request of his English grandmother—and historically, nineteen-year-old Geertrui relates her experience of British soldiers’s attempts to liberate Holland from its German occupation. (S)

2003 Printz Honor Books

House of the Scorpion by Nancy Farmer

In a future where humans despise clones, Matt enjoys special status as the young clone of El Patrón, the 142-year-old leader of a corrupt drug empire nestled between Mexico and the United States. (M, S)

My Heartbeat by Garret Freymann-Weyr

As she tries to understand the closeness between her older brother and his best friend, fourteen-year-old Ellen finds her relationship with each of them changing. (M, S)

Hole In My Life by Jack Gantos

The author relates how, as a young adult, he became a drug user and smuggler, was arrested, did time in prison, and eventually got out and went to college, all the while hoping to become a writer. (S)

2002 Printz Award Winner

A Step From Heaven by An Na

When she is five, Young Ju Park and her family move from Korea to California. Life in America, however, presents problems for Young Ju’s family. Over the years, her father becomes depressed, angry, and violent. Jobs are scarce and money is even scarcer. When her brother is born, Young Ju experiences firsthand her father’s sexism as he confers favored status upon the boy who will continue to carry the Park name. (M, S)

2002 Printz Honor Books

The Ropemaker by Peter Dickinson

When the magic that protects their Valley starts to fail, Tilja and her companions journey into the evil Empire to find the ancient magician Faheel, who originally cast those spells. (M, S)

Heart To Heart: New Poems Inspired By Twentieth-Century American Art edited by Jan Greenberg

A compilation of poems by Americans writing about American art in the twentieth century, including such writers as Nancy Willard, Jane Yolen, and X.J. Kennedy. (M, S)

Freewill by Chris Lynch

A teenager trying to recover from the tragic death of his father and stepmother believes himself to be responsible for the rash of teen suicides occurring in his town. (S)

True Believer by Virginia Euwer Wolff

Living in the inner city amidst guns and poverty, fifteen-year-old LaVaughn learns from old and new friends, and inspiring mentors, that life is what you make it–an occasion to rise to. (M, S)

2001 Printz Award Winner

Kit’s Wilderness by David Almond

Thirteen-year-old Kit goes to live with his grandfather in the decaying coal mining town of Stoneygate, England, and finds both the old man and the town haunted by ghosts of the past. (M, S)

2001 Printz Honor Books

Many Stones by Carolyn Coman

After her sister Laura is murdered in South Africa, Berry and her estranged father travel there to participate in the dedication of a memorial in her name. (M, S)

Angus, Thongs And Full-Frontal Snogging by Louise Rennison

Presents the humorous journal of a year in the life of a fourteen-year-old British girl who tries to reduce the size of her nose, stop her mad cat from terrorizing the neighborhood animals, and win the love of handsome hunk Robbie. (M, S)

The Body Of Christopher Creed by Carol Plum-Ucci

Torey Adams, a high school junior with a seemingly perfect life, struggles with doubts and questions surrounding the mysterious disappearance of the class outcast. (S)

Stuck In Neutral by Terry Trueman

Fourteen-year-old Shawn McDaniel, who suffers from severe cerebral palsy and cannot function, relates his perceptions of his life, his family, and his condition, especially as he believes his father is planning to kill him. (M, S)

2000 Printz Award Winner

Monster by Walter Dean Myers

While on trial as an accomplice to a murder, sixteen-year-old Steve Harmon records his experiences in prison and in the courtroom in the form of a film script as he tries to come to terms with the course his life has taken. (S)

2000 Printz Honor Books

Skellig by David Almond

Unhappy about his baby sister’s illness and the chaos of moving into a dilapidated old house, Michael retreats to the garage and finds a mysterious stranger who is something like a bird and something like an angel. (M, S)

Speak by Laurie Halse Anderson

Melinda Sordino busted an end-of-summer party by calling the cops. Now her old friends won’t talk to her, and people she doesn’t even know hate her from a distance. The safest place to be is alone, inside her own head. But even that’s not safe. Because there’s something she’s trying not to think about, something about the night of the party that, if she let it in, would blow her carefully constructed disguise to smithereens. And then she would have to speak the truth. (M, S)

Hard Love by Ellen Wittlinger

After starting to publish a zine in which he writes his secret feelings about his lonely life and his parents’ divorce, sixteen-year-old John meets an unusual girl and begins to develop a healthier personality. (S)

 
 

Grade Level Interest
M Middle School (defined as grades 6-8).
S Senior High (defined as grades 9-12).
A/YA Adult-marketed book recommended for teens.

 
 
Back to Award Winners
 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

 
%d bloggers like this: